VECTOR FIELD DECOMPOSITION

Some time ago I wrote a blog post about generating tangent and smoothly varying vector fields  on arbitrary meshes.  The method I’ve used works basically by specifying some constraints such as vortices, sources, sinks and guiding curves/edges, which are then interpolated over the surface to compute the final field. Depending on the constraints we achieve very different kinds of vector fields which have different properties and hence different applications. So, while the resulting vector field might be exactly what you need as velocity field in a fluid simulation, it might be completely useless for remeshing. The main reason for this is related to curl and/or divergence. Generally speaking, whenever we are computing or just working with vector fields, we always have to deal with at least one of the three interrelated main differential operators – gradient, divergence and curl.

For instance, applying the gradient operator on a scalar field results in a curl-free vector field. If we then apply a local rotation around 90 degrees, we get the orthogonal counterpart in the form of a divergence-free field. This is e.g. exactly what we need as velocity field for a fluid simulation since we usually want fluids to be incompressible. Furthermore we have to take care of open edges at which we usually want to have tangential boundary conditions, at least in case we are working with fluids.

Well, though all this sounds easy, the problem is that in most cases we just don’t have these nice velocity fields. Normally they are neither gradient fields nor solenoidal fields but rather a mixture of both. In other words we are dealing with vector fields which aren’t completely divergence-free. That’s the reason why we need to apply pressure projection in DOPS which finally computes a proper velocity field needed for fluids. This works nicely in the simulation environment on volumes. But what if we need to do the same in SOPS and on surfaces? Of course we could still rely on volumes, do all the operations we need to do and bring the result back onto the original mesh. While this works to some degree, it is far from being optimal – the result will most probably be inaccurate and we will be limited to solenoidal and gradient vector fields. What we could do instead is to work directly with vector fields on the surface. Typically any vector field on a simply-connected domain could be decomposed into the sum of an irrotational (curl-free), a solenoidal (divergence-free) and a harmonic (divergence-free and curl-free) field. This technique is known as Hodge-Helmholtz decomposition and is basically achieved by minimizing the energy functionals for the irrotational and the solenoidal component of the field by solving the Poisson equation. Finally the harmonic component will be computed as the residual.

While divergence-free vector fields are essential for any kind of fluid simulation, curl-free and harmonic fields are essential for many other applications, such as remeshing, texture synthesis and parameterization to name a few. The irrotational component of the vector field is curl-free, therefore it is equivalent to the gradient of a scalar potential function on simply-connected domains. In other words it is integrable. This means that we can reproduce the scalar field from the irrotational vector field because it is exactly the gradient of the desired scalar field. The isolines of the scalar field are therefore exactly orthogonal to the vector field. In case the vector field is not curl-free, we can treat it as a gradient of a function and minimize the difference between the gradient and the given vector field in the least squares sense. Again this leads to the well known Poisson equation.

 

 

 

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